Fisheye reports JIRA "seems to be offline".

I am trying to connect a new instance of Fisheye 2.10.2 to JIRA 5.2. Both of these servers have an HTTPS reverse proxy in front of them like this:

Fisheye: https://intranet.example.com/source

JIRA: https://intranet.example.com/issues

Yes, it is a self-signed certificate, but I've used keytool to add the root CA cert to the key store on both servers and have tested it via Java SSLPoke to make sure everythings works. In fact, both of these servers use the same certificate to successfully get to our LDAPS server. So I don't think it is a cert issue.

However, the reverse proxy server (intranet.example.com) also uses HTTP Basic authentication. We have created a user specifically for these two systems to communicate and have also tested logging in via that user/password via the "lynx" command line browser to ensure there are no firewall issues.

I've followed the procedure to link the applications starting on the Fisheye side. When I initially create the link in Fisheye using the "https://intranet.example.com/issues" URL it tells me that it can't recognize what type of server that is and I have to tell it manually that it is a JIRA server. That seemed wrong to me right off the bat, but at the same time unless it also asks me for basic authentication credentials (which it doesnt), I don't know how it could even reach that server. So I save the application link anyway and later configured the basic auth credentials under "outgoing authentication" -- but still is reports that the server seems offline.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

1 answer

1 accepted

It turns our the real problem was our use of Basic Authentication...which is not supported for use between Atlassian app-linked servers and will likely never be supported:

https://jira.atlassian.com/browse/JRA-23997?page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:all-tabpanel

The workaround was to modify the location access rules in the Apache reverse proxy to allow the Atlassian servers through without basic authentication.

Order Deny,Allow

Deny from all

Allow from 192.168.42.74

Allow from 192.168.42.77

Allow from 192.168.42.78

Satisfy Any

Now everything works like a charm.

Note that an alternative solution would have been to open a second HTTP port connection for each server (like a back door) and use those LAN addresses. This actually worked for linking to JIRA and Confluence because they run in Tomcat and I could easily make the required changes to server.xml. However, Fisheye runs in an embedded Jetty container and I could not find a way to have both the http and https-proxy connections open at the same time.

Suggest an answer

Log in or Join to answer
Community showcase
Sarah Schuster
Posted Jan 29, 2018 in Jira

What are common themes you've seen across successful & failed Jira Software implementations?

Hey everyone! My name is Sarah Schuster, and I'm a Customer Success Manager in Atlassian specializing in Jira Software Cloud. Over the next few weeks I will be posting discussion topics (8 total) to ...

3,129 views 13 19
Join discussion

Atlassian User Groups

Connect with like-minded Atlassian users at free events near you!

Find a group

Connect with like-minded Atlassian users at free events near you!

Find my local user group

Unfortunately there are no AUG chapters near you at the moment.

Start an AUG

You're one step closer to meeting fellow Atlassian users at your local meet up. Learn more about AUGs

Groups near you
Atlassian Team Tour

Join us on the Team Tour

We're bringing product updates and pro tips on teamwork to ten cities around the world.

Save your spot