How can i create a child project of an existing project in JIRA?

I want to create & maintain parent - child relationship in JIRA projects and i am not getting any clue with on-line help about how to create a sub project of an existing project in JIRA?

5 answers

1 accepted

1 votes

Jira does not have sub-projects. The general answer to this question is "use components to define the parts that you would sub-project", but that only works for some cases.

If you describe the structure you're aiming for here, you should find people have several suggestions for workarounds.

Unfortunately, the way we are using JIRA in our projects doesn't allow QA Engineers to manage their sprints in sync with DEV team and to manage my QA team project management scrums, i have been asked to have a child project of an existing JIRA project and manage QA related efforts. The reason why we require a parent child relationship is to integrate the Parent project Stories with Child Proiects using JIRA APIs and keep the work in sync.

Generally, QA sprints are not in sync with Dev Sprints.

That doesn't really sound like sub-projects are needed.

I'd move the QA out into it's own project and link the QA items to the development items in the project. Even if you had sub-projects, you'd still have to do that anyway, so there's no benefits there anyway.

The other (messier IMHO) option would be to do QA within the current project - you'd get the benefits of being able to raise QA items as sub-tasks of issues, and/or issues in their own right, but you'd be stuck with the same versions and components.

Nic, thanks for your suggestion & the option you mentioned is already known to us. We have a project where we are using VersionOne since long time and there we have a concept of Multi Tenancy model by VersionOne which helped us very well to manage our project management activities. Pretty recently my team have been involved in another project where JIRA has been utilized and the business doesn't want to change how we manage project management ir-respective of tool and i.e. i was trying to match apple to apple.

Anyways, i have understood JIRA limitation and will go with a new project for QA which will be at par with Dev. Its just a matter of detailing the business, why we can't have multi tenancy project management in JIRA.

Thanks once again.

I have been looking for a method to manage the portfolio of all the projects plus the operational work of the department. Everyone is using JIRA, and this video about JIRA looked very promising: http://tinypmo.wordpress.com/2011/05/25/rule-your-roadmap-no-matter-how-much-it-moves/#comment-31. The problem with this method is that tasks and sub tasks are already being used--the method aggregates that needed information by making each task represent a project and each sub task represent a task. That would eliminate the possibility of having sub tasks since you cannot have a sub task of a sub task. I'm thinking that the solution presented may work: one project for the department, a component for each of the projects and also for each section of operational work, and then we would use tasks and sub tasks in the normal way. Do you think this would work, or is there a better way to do this?

Renjith Pillai Community Champion Jan 10, 2013

JIRA only have two levels of issue hierarchy. To achieve mult level management at a issue level, you can use the below plugins

https://marketplace.atlassian.com/plugins/com.docminer.jira.issue-links

https://marketplace.atlassian.com/plugins/com.almworks.jira.structure

Hi

I wonder could you help me. My organisation would like to create an extra level in the JIRA hierarchy. To elaborate, we would like to have the main parent level as one project (Company Name), as a child of the parent we would like "Component/Release level", as a child of this level we would like to introduce a new level, called "Business Requirements" and have the Issue as the bottom level of the hierarchy, with tasks etc coming under this. Is it possible to add in this new level, representing "Business Requirements", bearing in mind we are using JIRA OnDemand?

Thanks for your help.

Stephen

Same answer. You can't do this, Jira has Projects, and that's it.

If you weren't on OnDemand, you could try the "structure plugin", which doesn't really do sub-projects as such (it's close), but does handle layers at the issue level. But it can't be used with OnDemand.

We have added sub-projects support to our "Component/Bundle/Subcomponent Version" add-on. It allows JIRA administrators to create hierarchy of projects using either virtual or real projects and adds a subproject picker to issue create screen. You can query issues belonging any level inside the hierarchy using "project in subprojectsOf()" JQL function. Please check user manual for more details.

jira-subprojects-selection-dialog.png

I was looking for it too then we came up with using the "components" field as subprojects. In components we have entered all out subprojects and made that mandatory field for that specific project while creating an issue. Once this is done, its easy to create filters based on componends and feed them to the widgets onto your dashboard.

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