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What is the difference between Kanban and Scrum, which one is best for your team?

 

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Today's topic is What is the difference between kanban and scrum, which one is best for your team?

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In this blog, we will explore the key differences between Kanban and Scrum and help you determine which one is best for your team.

What is the difference between kanban and scrum, which one is best for your team?

What is Kanban and Scrum?

First, let's talk about Kanban. Kanban is a visual approach to managing work, based on the principles of Just-in-Time and Lean manufacturing. In software development, Kanban involves visualizing the work to be done on a Kanban board, with tasks or user stories represented as cards or sticky notes. The focus is on managing flow, limiting work in progress, and delivering value continuously. Kanban has no prescribed timeboxes or ceremonies, and work is pulled from the backlog and completed as quickly as possible. This makes it a great choice for teams that value flexibility and responsiveness over predictability.

Now, let's move on to Scrum. Scrum is an agile framework for managing and completing complex projects. It's based on the principles of transparency, inspection, and adaptation. The framework consists of three roles: Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Development Team. Sprints are timeboxed iterations of work, typically lasting between one and four weeks, and each sprint begins with a planning meeting. The Development Team then works on the selected items and holds a daily stand-up meeting to synchronize their activities and identify any impediments to progress. The sprint ends with a review and retrospective meeting, where the Development Team demonstrates the work completed during the sprint and reflects on their process. This structured approach makes Scrum a great choice for teams that need a clear framework to manage complex projects.

What is the difference between Kanban and Scrum?

Kanban and Scrum are two popular project management frameworks used to visualize and manage the flow of work. The main differences between them are:What is the difference between kanban and scrum, which one is best for your team?

  1. Approach to work management: Kanban is a visual framework that uses a board to manage tasks and monitor progress, and is designed to be flexible and adaptive. Scrum is a structured framework specifically designed for software development projects, and uses sprints, time-boxed periods during which specific goals are set and achieved.
  2. Flexibility: Kanban is more flexible and adaptable, allowing teams to change the process as needed, while Scrum follows a more structured and defined process.
  3. Collaboration and communication: Scrum includes regular stand-up meetings and sprint retrospectives, which provide opportunities for the team to collaborate and communicate. Kanban does not have a specific time for regular team communication, but it still allows for collaboration through the visual representation of the work.
  4. Time-boxed vs. non-time-boxed: Scrum is based on sprints, which are time-boxed periods of work, while Kanban does not have a specific time-box and is designed to be more flexible.
  5. Predictability: Scrum is designed for projects with high levels of uncertainty and unpredictability, while Kanban is better suited for projects with predictable and stable workloads.

Which one is best for your team?

So, which one is best for your team? The answer, as you might have guessed, is that it depends on your team's specific needs and circumstances. If your team values flexibility and responsiveness over predictability, Kanban may be the right choice. On the other hand, if your team needs a structured framework to manage complex projects, Scrum may be the better option.

It's also worth mentioning that some teams may choose to use a hybrid approach, combining elements of Kanban and Scrum to create a customized agile framework that meets their specific needs. This approach can be particularly useful for teams that have unique requirements or that are working on projects that don't fit neatly into either Kanban or Scrum.

  1. Workload variability: If your team's workload is variable or unpredictable, Kanban may be the better choice. The lack of a predetermined schedule allows teams to work on tasks when they are ready, which can help to ensure that tasks are completed efficiently.
  2. Project uncertainty: If your project is highly uncertain or unpredictable, Scrum may be the better choice. The sprints provide a structure that helps to mitigate risk, and the continuous improvement focus of the framework can help your team stay on track.
  3. Process flexibility: If your team requires a high level of process flexibility, Kanban may be the better choice. The lack of a predetermined schedule allows teams to adapt to changing circumstances and respond to new information as it becomes available.
  4. Collaboration and communication: If your team requires regular collaboration and communication, Scrum may be the better choice. The daily stand-up meetings and sprint retrospectives provide regular opportunities for the team to communicate and collaborate, which can help to ensure that everyone is on the same page and working towards the same goals.
  5. Team size and structure: If your team is small and cohesive, either Kanban or Scrum can be effective. However, if your team is larger or more dispersed, Scrum may be the better choice as it provides a structure for communication and collaboration that can help to keep everyone aligned.

Both Kanban and Scrum are effective project management frameworks, but the right choice depends on your team's specific needs and circumstances. If your team's workload is variable or unpredictable, Kanban may be the better choice. If your project is highly uncertain or unpredictable, Scrum may be the better choice. The key is to consider your team's specific needs and choose the framework that best supports your goals and objectives.

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5 comments

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Ernst Fortunits April 19, 2023

DANKE für die Erklärung !

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edwin vasquez
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April 19, 2023

Thanks for sharing!

 

It's not uncommon for teams to try one framework first and then move to the other. Sometimes you just have to try one to see if it works for you and your team. 

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Joseph Hansbrough April 20, 2023

Vey helpful comparison, with clear suggestions for the reader to determine what makes sense for them. Thank you for this!

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Lukeman Cole
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January 10, 2024

Thanks for sharing!

Chris Coombes
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June 3, 2024

Apologies, though there are some misunderstandings here I had to address below. The image in the middle used has quite a few anti-patterns which don't align to the Scrum guide, the Kanban guide or the Agile manifesto either. 

Scrum -
- It's not a process, it's a lightweight framework which can be improved by the use of other techniques or tools. "Various processes, techniques and methods can be employed within the framework." - Kanban metrics work well with Scrum and Scrum.org even have 'Kanban for Scrum Teams'
- There are no pre assigned roles, the Developers are self managing to work towards the Sprint Goal. The team are working towards being cross-functional allowing anyone to pick up anything. That's where they're working towards but it does take time.
- Tasks are not assigned, they can be picked up by team members, but it's the teams 'Commitment' to work towards the sprint goal as a team effort, not an individual accountability to complete specific items. 
- Timeboxes are used to allow teams to demonstrate potentially releasable and working software for stakeholders to inspect, then the teams can adapt. It's not timelines of a project plan.
- Changes can be made anytime during the Sprint, though if the Sprint Goal becomes obsolete, then the Sprint is often cancelled and the Scrum team reconfirms what the new goal is. "Responding to change" is one of the key 4 values of the Agile manifesto and this applies to Scrum.
- Story Points have never been, nor are they part of Scrum. Also the measure of productivity should be measured on value delivered by the demonstration of working software, not story points.


Kanban -
- There are no defined roles in Kanban
- Items are pulled into development based on backlog priority
- Interactions, collaboration are continual in both Kanban and Scrum, there's no gatekeeping or barrier in either one. There's no predefined plan in Kanban for anything to change, according to a plan, as it's based on priority backlog for the deemed highest value or important item to be selected. "Customer Collaboration over contract negotiation" is one the 4 manifesto values which is key in both Kanban and Scrum which emphasis continual collaboration between stakeholders and developers
- Productivity is based on 4 key flow metrics (ProKanban.org) - 2 Lagging Indicators; Throughput (how many items over a measure of time) & Cycle Time (elapsed time from when an item starts development to complete) and 2 Leading Indicators; WIP Limits and Work Item Age (how long has an item been in progress and is this due to exceed our Service Level Expectation)
- There can be continual communication in Kanban and you can still utilise meetings to stay in communication at all times, regardless of the naming of the meeting.

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