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How to clear Sourcetree push status

I have (since I am new to GIT) some files ready to be pushed on the master branch. I however don't want to ever push to the master, does anyone know how I can see what files I have committed but not yet pushed and how to possibly un-commit them, if something like that is possible.

1 answer

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minnsey Atlassian Team Mar 04, 2019

Hi

If you look in the History view you will see a log of your commits. You can then select any given commit and using the context menu (if you are on Windows) you can choose to either revert commits or reset your repository to a state before your commit.

Reverts will essentially create a new commit reverting the effects of the selected commit.

e.g. If you had 2 commits you didn't want, 3 and 4 in the list below

  • commit 4
  • commit 3
  • commit 2
  • commit 1

  • you would revert them in reverse order, e.g. revert 4 then revert 3. This would put you back in the state you had at 2 but your history would look like this

  • commit 6 (reverting 3)
  • commit 5 (reverting 4) 
  • commit 4
  • commit 3
  • commit 2
  • commit 1

If you choose to reset to commit 2 you are effectively un-doing commits 3 and 4, it is like they never happened.

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