I am trying to allow certain users access to only certain projects (both Jira and SVN)

For example, if I have projects A, B and C, and I want user 1 to only have access to project A, and user 2 to only have access to project B, how do I do this?

I'd like the users to have full access to both Jira and SVN for their given project, but not to have access to any other project.

I've tried assigning Project Roles, but that doesn't seem to do it (or I'm doing it wrong).

Please help.

4 answers

1 vote

Look at the permission schemes. These say things like "if user is in role X, then they can browse the project".

To set up your scenario, you can do one of two things.

1. Set up TWO permission schemes, one per project. In the first permission scheme, include user 1, and associate it with project A. In the second, include user 2 and associate it with project B

2. Set up ONE permission scheme, using it in both projects. But set up a way to include users an a variable way. That's where roles are most useful - you can put "if user is in role Y, then they can browse the project". Using that, you'd put user 1 in role Y for project A and user 2 in role Y for project B.

I suspect you've also inherited the default setup for user groups in Jira - it is simple and quick for new users, but it's an utterly dreadful way to default things. As soon as you realise you want to do some work with permissions, you'll have to un-pick it all and rebuild before you can even begin to do anything useful. There's a group "jira users" which everyone is added to. It's used to say "person can log into Jira", which is fine, but then Atlassian set up a spectacularly bad default/example, and used the same group to let people "browse" in permission schemes too. You'll need to separate that out and stop using jira-users for anything other than "can log in". I've lost count of the number of sites I've had to unpick this mess on, just to get basic permissions working correctly. (It is, of course, fine, if you genuinely want all your users to be able to see everything forever)

1 vote

Hi Drew,

We have some great documentation of setting this up, you can find it over at:

* https://confluence.atlassian.com/display/AOD/Managing+project+visibility

In summary, you'll want to create a group for all people accessing project A and then another group for all people accessing project B. From there you'll want to edit the JIRA project permissions so that the users project role for project A contains the group for project A and not the users group (project role documentation here) and the same for project B. You'll then want to configure the source permissions in the same way (documentation here).

Let me know if you have any questions or want me to go into detail on any point. :)

Cheers,

Matt

0 vote

Look at the permission schemes. These say things like "if user is in role X, then they can browse the project".

To set up your scenario, you can do one of two things.

1. Set up TWO permission schemes, one per project. In the first permission scheme, include user 1, and associate it with project A. In the second, include user 2 and associate it with project B

2. Set up ONE permission scheme, using it in both projects. But set up a way to include users an a variable way. That's where roles are most useful - you can put "if user is in role Y, then they can browse the project". Using that, you'd put user 1 in role Y for project A and user 2 in role Y for project B.

I suspect you've also inherited the default setup for user groups in Jira - it is simple and quick, but it's an utterly dreadful way to default things, because as soon as you realise you want to do some work with permissions, you'll have set up a load of stuff using it and you need to un-pick it all and rebuild before you can even begin to do anything useful with permissions. There's a group "jira users" which everyone is added to. It's used to say "person can log into Jira", which is fine, but then Atlassian set up a spectacularly bad default/example, and used the same group to let people "browse" in permission schemes too. You'll need to separate that out and stop using jira-users for anything other than "can log in". I've lost count of the number of sites I've had to unpick this mess on, just to get basic permissions working correctly.

Thanks for the pointer Matthew. I was able to configure the permissions using that guide without problems!

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