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RepositoryMergeRequestCheckContext getSettings list

David Gersh Apr 16, 2015

I've found the https://bitbucket.org/atlassian/stash-example-merge-check-config/src/1c11b0e69878?at=master example code when starting to learn about the project. I'm trying to do something similar to what this plugin is doing but I need to check the branch name of the current branch.

The int requiredReviewers = context.getSettings().getInt("reviewers", 0); leads me to believe that the name might be in here somewhere, or perhaps its easily found in the chain of context.getMergeRequest().getPullRequest().

So the first question is, where can I get a list of items available via getSettings and the second is, is there an easier way to get the branch name of the repo for which the merge request check is firing?

1 answer

1 accepted

1 vote
Answer accepted
Ben Humphreys Atlassian Team May 05, 2015

Hi David,

You are correct, the target branch can be fetched from the PullRequest object. For example:

public void check(@Nonnull RepositoryMergeRequestCheckContext context) {
	Ref toRef = context.getMergeRequest().getPullRequest().getToRef();
}

You then have the option of retrieving the fully qualified string (e.g. refs/heads/master) via getId() or the unqualified string (e.g. master) via getDisplayId().

Regarding your other question, the contents of settings is going to differ from context to context. You can call asMap() on the Settings object to fetch all key/value pairs. 

David Gersh May 07, 2015

Thanks.

https://answers.atlassian.com/questions/15290328 was a similar thread to this one which resulted in the same answer.

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